Shining Boy BB Cream

Shining boy is a brand I found by sheer chance and it falls into that category of quirky and outwith my norm for male grooming but this does not detract from the company in any shape or form. While many say that makeup is universal there is still a degree of stigma attached to men buying makeup that they are working to take away with their quirky concepts.

shining boy makeup.jpg

For those taking their first steps into the world of makeup as a boy/man or just looking for something that will be quick, simple and easy to use then a BB cream is generally a good starting point. With the Shining boy BB cream, its targeted specifically at men and boys with a view to making clean skin a quicker process and creates a gateway to experimentation with the wider range of their cosmetics (in particular the eye shadow palettes).

The silver tone of the packaging and overall feel is standard and would not look out of place in a gym bag as it resembles a moisturiser or a post shave balm. The actual product has all the hallmarks of a premium BB cream (BB standing for Beauty balm) in that it offers an all encompassing product with skincare, concealer and light coverage that will in essence give the skin a fresh, rested look. Available in two shades of light and wheatish (medium/tan). Like many BB creams it is still advisable to use a powder to set although it is relatively long wearing depending on your own skin type and texture. The ingredients overall do have all the qualities I would expect and the added bonus of being waterproof making it an ideal addition to a summer regime.

The rest of the shining boy range is more about fun and experimentation with vibrant colour palettes and a more whimsical sense of playfulness but it is the BB cream that does stand out in the range from a grooming perspective as its designed to be easy to use and stands as a reminder that grooming (in the social media age) is an important factor for the well dressed gent or artistically minded soul who wants to be seen in the best possible light.

To learn more about the company see:

Shining Boy Website

Shining Boy Instagram

Shining Boy Facebook

*A quick google search on the Shining Boy brand is enlightening and offers an interesting perspective on the range but in all honesty it doesn’t detract from the company for me it just allows a little insight into the company and the nearest competitors in terms of look and ingredients (not to mention pricing)

Explaining the Lost Boys

The Lost Boys as a concept has a dark heart, its a patchwork of different aspects from the darker side of the Peter Pan story to the current social and political atmosphere where we see people such as Milo Yiannopoulos who has talked openly about the disenfranchisement of young men over the last decade.

Abandoned spaces (image for illustrative purposes only)

Abandoned spaces (image for illustrative purposes only)

Melding these elements together The Lost Boys became a sort of tongue in cheek reference to the way men are viewed and takes some of the “boy who never grew up” stories and expand on them with a touch of the grunge movement, American Gothic and the subversion of masculinity.

The images themselves will be built around derelict buildings, waste ground and a fractured symbolism of nature. Each model will have his own story that will hint at both the inspiration of Pans Lost Boys to the more dystopic visuals of the backdrop to fit with the “council estate boys" look of the models.

Additionally, to the clean makeup looks I have planned, there will be integration (slowly) of character makeup elements such as scarring and bruising to add depth to the characters to give a level of the cinematic and a harsher reality of the concept.

I am going to add extra kit soon and will release details on what goes into a lost shoot in terms of gear from the camera equipment to the makeup and brushes used which in-itself will be released as a blog or blogs.

While I appreciate this is a personal project it will be used to promote the Lost Project and give a voice to a different side of my own commercial/media background in makeup design taking a little of the narrative described above into projects that are currently being scripted with a view to building a stable of work.

The Lost Narrative Defined

I have written a few blogs over the last week or so that while I stand by the commentary I did feel it was ott and dramatic and deserved to be pulled so if anyone is wondering why its simple. I do stand by it but just decided that its not worth the hassle and I want to focus my energies on better things. While this may seem like an admission of guilt its far, far from it. Call me a primadonna if you wish, I really don’t mind. I want to clarify a few small points and clear the air before I start my run at defining what the Lost Boys and Lost Girls story is as a narrative and visual concept, it has a little touch of darkness to it and has been brewing in my head for a long time.

same shit different day

In addition to this as a means to move forward I spoke to one of my scriptwriters and will be sitting this weekend sketching, going through old designs and knuckling down to do the creative and commercial work I have been promising myself I would get done. Calls will be made to those who have shown loyalty and I am going to reinvest not only in my own business again but in the work I have been postponing to support others.

This does not mean I will not be available for clients, far from it, what it does mean is that priority goes to my own work and I will be extremely selective who I work with from this point on.

While the sentiment may be same shit different day, it won’t be my groundhog day and I can see a way to end the current narrative. The problems are no longer mine and I can finally put this to bed and give myself the opportunity to showcase my own skills.

Watch this space, The Lost Stories (combined with Behind the Brushes) is coming back with some fantastic narratives and beauty launches thanks mainly to my connections to various PR agencies which will allow me to give a little time to clearing the cobwebs creatively and finally doing justice to the Lost Girls and the Lost Boys concept that I have on paper created giving it a more visual sense of what its all about.

Dismantling the Narrative of Support

I really do owe a debt of gratitude to the Scottish fashion community (and just as importantly the Scottish film community too). You really know how to un-person your own creative talent and destroy your own narrative about how important it is to support anything Scottish from fashion events YOU demand through to films that you have no clue how to sell or finance, they have to be supported because Scotland. It really is amazing to me that geography trumps business.

We had a realistic line in the sand over what our expectations for the pop-up show and what it would bring, it was being used as a stepping stone to create more and it was going to be difficult to push without support and without a huge amount of effort on our part. That we did. We spent money on ads, we spent hours contacting businesses from self employed buyer through to the Scottish fashion community and of course the press who’s client base was exactly the same as we needed at the event.

The outcome of this?

I see right through you

Well it was simple. Everyone, and I do mean everyone from the Enterkine Hotel through to the various fashion based individuals such as the bloggers, fashion index and calendar (all with the geographic tag of Scotland) declined or ignored the messages and attempts to reach out to them. So the people who were crying out for fashion shows, to be taken as seriously in the market as the rest of the UK, particularly London, all of them sat on their hands.

This was an absolutely insane move on all fronts, what could have and should have been an opportunity to promote Scotland as a viable entity in the market was ignored. What was an easy sell in London we knew would take a little more effort up here, and it was within the interest of all parties to make it work.

So why didn’t they? I have some theories on this:

We went outside the prescribed norms and did this without permission or consent from the cliques. By this I mean simply we didn’t approach any of the current “collective” teams of makeup artists, photographers and those who are “running” the social media groups for the “fashion industry in Scotland.”

Everyone sat and waited to be asked. A prime example of this was models. Scottish Agencies wanted between 10 and 100 times the going rate of London to provide models for a show, no negotiations, no information on what “industry standard” rate of pay they required would be, just that they wanted that for their models AND a consultation fee for last minute booking and arrangement. Oddly they were un-surprised at the details of the event and just asked for money with no clear definable boundary as to why the rate was set so high. Something I have noticed is the minute you mention budgets, no matter the skill level its automatically pay me industry rate, usually the top level rate for time served (eg senior rate for 10 year plus staff) to someone who has Zero experience or has never been paid for the various “indie” projects on their CV.

*In London, agencies will loan out new faces on request for shows and use it as a platform to create other business as they know that a successful show will generate look books, editorials (paid) and advertorials. So they generally accept expenses for the models on the understanding that its a trade test.

Expanding on the waiting to be asked notion, where were the creatives from makeup and photography? What was the issue? You will pay a small fortune to go to London and complain that Scotland should have professional shows that you can cover so why didn’t you step up and ask for info or try and get a foot in the door using the trade test logic or at least support it? What were you waiting for an engraved invitation? The networking potential was there but you didn’t take it. Does that trip to London generate business or are you just sending images on spec to papers and magazines (usually low end) in the hopes of getting published, why not do that for a Scottish show? You wanted it, we created it, you ignored it.

One thing that was said that still confounds me was the hotel, the Enterkine house hotel in Annbank near Ayr. When questioned on their lack of support for the show, the Owner begged me to do something to promote her hotel hence bringing London and international designers for a show, the manageress stated “we don’t promote outside events and anyway I had no idea how to promote a fashion event.” So the ticket link and details were not enough? You can’t work with social media? A simple share on your social accounts would have been a step in the right direction.

So with all this in mind, I want to again state my thanks to the Scottish fashion (and film/TV) circuit for opening my eyes to how the demand to be taken seriously in the industry only stretches as far as talk.

I will always be proud of my Scottish heritage but from here on, thats as far as it goes. I see right through the support Scottish creatives talk and know thats all it is. Talk.