Reaching Out To Other Artists

reaching out

In the last few months, I have spoken to people who are entering the makeup industry or have in-laws etc who are trying to gain some experience in the industry. Now it may surprise people to know that Yes, I am still working. My business is cut into 3 distinct areas (see below) and I rarely if ever have the time to chase down inquiries about work experience that are done in person when I am walking down the street.

  1. Beauty writer.

  2. Editorial and magazine imaging.

  3. Film and TV.

Something I encourage people to do is look at my websites, check my social accounts and email me. Now this may seem a little unfair or dismissive but let’s be clear, I do have a business to run and I am inclined now more than ever, to deal with people via email rather than on the phone.

So with this in mind I want to lay out some basic rules and lay the groundwork that will help you with other potential artists:

Do your research before you contact them. Check all their information, a website may have a limited amount of work on it for a reason such as projects are not released yet, etc.

Let the person know you are aware of their work and make it clear why you are in contact. For example:

“I looked through your work and it’s in the area of makeup artistry I would like to be a part of, my background is limited but I am open to learning about the industry. If you have any projects coming up I would like to be considered, here is my website and contact information. I look forward to hearing from you in the near future.”

Don’t look down on an assistant placement. I cannot stress this enough You are not going to be co-designer or head of the department, I will not step down from a job to give you a chance. I have a business too and I have a right to earn a living just the same as you.

I am always happy to talk to people but when it comes to business but you need to keep an open mind and remember that you are not my priority my clients are, so if the response is not what you want or the person you reach out to offers constructive feedback accept it and take it on board.

Again, I want to make this clear, I nor any other artist out there, is going to chase you around. If you know I am working on a project, if you know there is a job available, then YOU need to make the effort to apply or reach out. *speculative emails, in general, I ignore UNLESS I see something solid that is professionally grounded.

Part of this was why I set up The Lost Creatives. If there is work available it will be posted there but it will be a job with a contract and terms. There will be no negotiations.

In summary, be sensible and aware that other people have businesses to run as well, be proactive and sensible it will benefit you more.